The Internet is Really Taking Over

0

People really can create an entire second life online….and spend REAL money in a virtual world. That is very perplexing…people will pay real money to buy something they won’t ever have? Pay to buy a soda they will never drink? Hmmmm……someone explain this to me…

Coke Promotes Itself in a New Virtual World


Published: December 7, 2007

COCA-COLA lovers will have a new place to hang out starting today, and it is an island on the Internet that is shaped like a Coke bottle.


CC Metro, the virtual world beginning today at there.com, where visitors create an avatar to shop for Coca-Cola products.

At CC Metro, the name of the island, visitors can set up a virtual alter ego known as an avatar, which can then shop and dance at the Coca-Cola diner, visit a movie theater to watch short films and soar around on a hoverboard like the one in the 1989 movie, “Back to the Future Part II.”

Coke is introducing its online island within a larger virtual world site called there.com that tries to filter out unsavory content. The company that operates there.com, Makena Technologies, uses software to censor user postings for foul language and employs a team of people to filter out content that might infringe on copyrights or fall outside a PG-13 rating. Makena, of San Mateo, Calif., says that these practices make its site desirable to advertisers.

At CC Metro, Coca-Cola customers can buy clothing and accessories for their avatars using reward points culled from codes on Coke bottle caps, which can also be used at mycokerewards.com. Customers can dress up their avatars as they move them around the island.

“It’s really bringing the offline world, where you’re drinking our products, and the online worlds together,” said Carol Kruse, vice president for global interactive marketing at the Coca-Cola Company.

There.com is not as famous as the virtual world Second Life, where companies like AdidasDell are advertising and selling products. About 573,000 people visited Second Life in October, while the traffic at there.com was too sparse to be picked up by the Web measurement company Nielsen Online. and

SOURCE: NY TIMES

Leave a comment


Name*

Email(will not be published)*

Website

Your comment*

Submit Comment

© Copyright societyandstyle.com - Designed by Kiss Chanel Designs