Being Successful and Black

0

I just saw this video of the promo of CNN’s special investigative series/multi-media platform Black in America (very relevant to say the least). I cannot wait to tune in.

check it out:

The NYTIMES recently had a piece about how top African American people such as Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey share the common thread of “not being too black.” They are black but not too black. Too black, according to the article, would mean that every so often they would reference the black struggle, or something of that nature every so often but people such as Winfrey and Obama seem to make a point to avoid it. Race is such a sensitive topic in America– when will the dialogue really begin? I think it may be starting with my generation, but we shall see.

Here is a blurb that really hit me:

Social observers say a common hallmark of African-Americans who have achieved the greatest success, whether in business, entertainment or politics — Oprah Winfrey, Magic Johnson and Mr. Obama — is that they do not convey a sense of black grievance.

Check out more of what the NYTIMES had to say by EXPANDING this post.


Millions of African-Americans celebrated Barack Obama’s historic victory, seeing in it a reflection — sudden and shocking — of their own expanded horizons. But whether Mr. Obama captures the White House in November will depend on how he is seen by white Americans. Indeed, some people argue that one of the reasons Mr. Obama was able to defeat Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton was that a large number of white voters saw him as “postracial.”

In other words, Mr. Obama was black, but not too black.

But where is the line? Does it change over time? And if it is definable, then how black can Mr. Obama be before he alienates white voters? Or, to pose the question more cynically, how black do the Republicans have to make him to win?

Social observers say a common hallmark of African-Americans who have achieved the greatest success, whether in business, entertainment or politics — Oprah Winfrey, Magic Johnson and Mr. Obama — is that they do not convey a sense of black grievance.

Clearly, Mr. Obama understands this. Until his former pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, forced race into the political debate, Mr. Obama rarely dwelt on it. He gave his groundbreaking speech on race only in response to the Wright controversy.

Indeed, after he effectively won the Democratic nomination on Tuesday, he left it to the media to point out the racial accomplishment, and the relative he thanked most emotively was the woman who raised him: his white grandmother.

There is a reason for this. Race is one of the most contentious issues in American society, and, as with many contentious issues, Americans like to choose the middle path between perceived extremes. “In many ways, Obama is an ideal middle way person — he is just as white as he is black,” said Alan Wolfe, a political science professor at Boston College.

Full HERE
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/08/weekinreview/08mabry.html

Leave a comment


Name*

Email(will not be published)*

Website

Your comment*

Submit Comment

© Copyright societyandstyle.com - Designed by Kiss Chanel Designs